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Michigan Stormwater

Michigan State Overview

The goal of the state of Michigan and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s Stormwater Program is to protect and preserve Michigan's water resources. The Michigan DEQ has since implemented two-step process to accomplish their goals in protecting and preserving their water resources:

  1. Michigan has been delegated the regulatory authority by the EPA to implement their own "State-Specific" National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting program.

  2. Michigan has developed and implemented a mandatory training component for stormwater management compliance which must be completed to authorize permission to apply for general permitting coverage.       

According to the MDEQ, any construction activities (clearing, grading, and excavating) that will disturb one (1) or more acres of land; disturb less than one (1) acre of total land area that is part of a larger common plan of development or sale if the larger common plan will ultimately disturb one (1) acre or more; and have point source discharges of stormwater to waters of the State (streams, rivers, lakes, and wetlands) are required to apply for and obtain coverage under a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Permit from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) Water Resources Department (WRD).

If any earth disturbing activity will be taking place on one (1) or more acres of land and is within 500 feet of a lake or stream, the project site owner or operator must acquire a Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Control (SESC) Permit. The MDEQ  also mandates that project operators or owners whose sites total one  (1) to five (5) acres of land disturbance, with a discharge to surface waters have automatic coverage without submitting an Notice of Coverage (NOC) if they have obtained the required Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Control (SESC) Permit.

DISCLAIMER: This program has not yet been approved by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

The goal of the state of Michigan and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s Stormwater Program is to protect and preserve Michigan's water resources. The Michigan DEQ has since implemented two-step process to accomplish their goals in protecting and preserving their water resources:

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Urban Hydrology and Green Stormwater Infrastructure: An Overview

Type: Virtual | Price: $0.00

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Course Overview

Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) has positioned itself as a solution for many issues facing urban environments, not just stormwater. Because of this, there is a lot of hype around the US among municipalities, engineers, and urban planners to name a few. This presentation will go over the basics of urban hydrology, the history of how we got here, and modern issues that GSI can address. We will review GSI solutions and lessons learned. Drawing from my experience on the ground with pilot projects in New York City and Philadelphia, I will share my thoughts and recommendations moving forward.

Panelist: Scott Jeffers, PE, PhD
Organizers: Andrew Demers

Outline:
1. Introductions
a. Andrew Demers and StormwaterONE
b. Scott Jeffers and my past experience
2. What is Urban Hydrology and why is it important
3. Grey vs green infrastructure
4. Types of GSI
5. Pilot GSI projects around the US
6. The triple bottom line approach
7. Recommendations for future GSI plans

Learning Objectives

• Describe the basics of urban hydrology and list issues surrounding it
• Identify types of GSI and when they are appropriate
• Describe the Triple Bottom Line approach

Special Instructions

Prerequisites

PDH Hours: 1
 
Due to high erosion rates, construction sites are by far the largest source of sediment that pollutes water resources of the United States.


Rating: 5.0 / 5.0

Committed Clients: